Keep digging to find “lost” ancestors in cemeteries, burial records

Pay attention.

Olivia J. Garland did just that and pushed memories from her childhood to discover a forgotten cemetery where her great-grandmother, America Virginia Fields, was buried in Henrico County, Virginia.

Garland remembered the rural path to funerals that she traveled as a girl. Garland’s remembrance of those county roads in Virginia and her interest in locating her great-grandmother’s grave, led to the uncovering of a “buried” cemetery. The great-granddaughter of Fields, also utilized land records, historical and cemetery records, volunteers and her determination to find the final resting place of her precious relative and nearly 20 other persons.

The campaign to locate others buried at the site continue.

Her story is encouraging to those who believe they’ve reached brick walls in Black family research that cannot allow for great outcomes. America Virginia Fields

Pay attention to the conversations, remembrances of childhood experiences, Bibles, diaries and other family materials.

1. Time to get in check (list) with our multi-generational chart updates

It’s 2023. Just in time for New Year’s resolutions to enhance our families’ five-generational check as supplied — for free — by the U.S. National Archives.

This is step one (1) of a multi-phase prep for the Good Genes Genealogy Services’ 2023 workshops and webinars. Stay tuned!

My big brother, Gene, and young sister, Missy, in our yard in Omaha, Nebraska sometime in 1967 or 1958.


Our Wilkes family gathering sometime in the 1920s.